Dear Beloved Community –

I’ve been thinking about public witness. At this week’s 9:30 Wednesday Eucharist, several folks witnessed or testified to times in their lives when they felt the very real presence of God working in their lives. I use the words witnessed and testified intentionally because they conjure up images of tent revivals, I actually said that it was like we were having a mini-revival. Words like a revival, witnessing, and testifying are not ones we are used to hearing very often in an Episcopal church but our Presiding Bishop Michael Curry and his Evangelism Team have been organizing “Episcopal Revivals” across the country. So, they are words we should be hearing and talking about.

It was a Holy Spirit moment to be graced with hearing people I have come to know and love share their faith in this way on Wednesday. It was truly powerful. I wish more of you could have been there to experience it and perhaps to share your testimony. I also realize that the Wednesday Eucharist is attended by a group of “regulars” who have come to know, trust, and pray for the healing of each other. It is, even on Zoom, an intimate and safe space. This is what has got me thinking. What other ways can we create intimate, safe spaces for ourselves? This is not a question I want to try and answer by myself. I’m hoping that perhaps some of you who are reading this might hear the Holy Spirit calling you to work with me to think creatively about how it might happen. I see part of my job as your priest to toss out these spiritually baited fish hooks to see who strikes which I guess sort of makes me a fisher of people. So, consider this baited hook tossed into the waters of St. Gabriel. Can I get a witness?

In the peace and love of Christ,
Everett+

Notes From a Vestry Member….

Personal Growth

I have often looked at weekends as time to recharge and take a break from doing work. It has been easy to sit back in church and let others acolyte, do readings, host coffee hours, usher…you get the idea.

My attitude about this changed during Holy week when I realized that we need more people to actively participate because there were so many services, multiple readings, etc.  So, I decided to face my fear about not knowing how to pronounce all those people and cities mentioned in some readings and decided to volunteer to be a reader. However, I will start easing into it by reading the Prayers of the People.  I tend to over think things so for me, starting something requires more thought than continuing to do it.

For some of you, standing in front of people might be intimidating, so with the advent of hybrid services we all have the luxury of reading in front of our laptops. Though it might not seem like it is a big help, I was told that it will be very appreciated by existing readers to lighten their load – kind of like “many hands make for light work.”

I encourage us all to check our comfort level and find something you enjoy doing or might enjoy doing.  The beauty of this is that it is not a long-term commitment so if we try something and want to try something different next week, that’s fine.  We never know what new things we do will speak to us and how we will personally and spiritually gain from the experience.

~George Kyler   image from gregburdine

Read about what happened when a church decided to practice anti-racism during Lent by giving up music composed by White musicians. Instead of hearing familiar pieces by European composers, they explained their “intent was to lay aside our usual frames of reference and open ourselves to hearing the Gospel message through the voices of Black People, Indigenous People, and People of Color.” As the pastor of that church said, “If you haven’t sung ‘Amen Siakudumisa’ by Stephen Cuthbert Molefe, do yourself a favor and sing it immediately!”

~Article from A Public Witness online blog, article by Brian Kaylor and Beau Underwood

~Image of Rev. John Edgerton from same blog

~Hymn from YouTube by Chorale Universitaire de Rouen

“We have stunned the world out of wonder” says Robert MacFarlane in his fascinating book Landmarks. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0241967872/

MacFarlane goes on the suggest that “once a landscape goes undescribed and therefore unregarded it becomes vulnerable to unwise use or improper action.” I think the same is true of animals and even something as small as the microbial bacteria in the soil. Not just a landscape or an animal I speculate as I think of the 1 million species that might become extinct [https://www.cnn.com/2019/05/06/world/one-million-species-threatened-extinction-humans-scn-intl/index.html] as a result of human action and the millions of faceless refugees and houseless people that live around us but that we rarely notice. “Language is fundamental to the possibility of re-wonderment for language does not just register experience, it produces it” MacFarlane says.

I love that Easter and Earth Day fall at the same time of the year. On Earth Day this year (Friday), why not consider celebrating God’s good creation with a walk on which you try to name each plant and tree that you pass – not with the generic name of its species but with specific names that describe its beauty and its glory? The lilac bush outside my window could become the fragrant purple flowered bush that fills my heart with delight. What if I try to find out the name of the man who sits on the corner each day begging for money and address him with a name that gives him dignity and respect? If I can’t find out his name I can give him one – the man with rugged face and far away eyes who speaks a language I do not understand.

The way we name things matters. “A desert wasteland” does not need to be respected. An undulating dune landscape hiding the wildflower seeds of future glorious blooming does. With a wave of our hands and the words of our mouth, we have re-enchanted this landscape, re-invested it with wonder and expectation.

I think this is what happened when Adam named the animals in Genesis. Each naming I suspect was an occasion of awe and wonder. I cannot imagine that he just gave them a generic “horse”, “dog” “antelope” kind of name without forethought or consideration for what the animal was. My impression is that he sat and pondered each one. Looking closely, maybe examining the creature, seeing how it was created and then naming it. The more intimately he knew the animal the more certain he was of what to call it.

The origin of many of the names by which we now know our animals has been lost but they still have meaning for us. Gazelle immediately conjures up an image of a swift, fast running antelope. Elephant is a large mammal with a long nose and beautiful curving tusks. Unfortunately there are many other created creatures we rarely name. Some of them we know better as cars that speed along our highways like cheetah, jaguar and impala or that trample its beauty with off road driving like rams and broncos. I was very concerned as I read MacFarlane’s book to hear that in the latest version of the Oxford Junior Dictionary there was a culling of words concerning nature. Words like dandelion, heron, herring, kingfisher, lark, and leopard have been repealed with blog, voice-mail, cut-and-paste instead.

How many creatures no longer register on our consciousness because we have no name for them or else have given them a name with negative connotations – like dandelions – weeds to one person but the most nutritious plants in the garden to another?

I love my friend Lilly Lewin’s suggestion that we should take a a wonder vacation, not to get away from wonder but to reintroduce it into our lives. To re-wonder our world we need to rediscover that this is a place of mystery and that means slowing down and taking time to notice. Re-wonderment means noticing not just the flower, but the unique and beautiful arrangement of each petal, the stamens at its center beckoning insects to its feast.. Re-wonderment means stopping to inhale the fragrance, the heady aroma, more exotic than any perfume, that often only lasts for a few short days before it fades.

I call my daily walks awe and wonder walks. They have opened my eyes to new depths of the beauty and my growing passion to become a better steward of God’s good creation. Awe does beget awe. Wonder inspires wonder, and in the process, there is that sense that we once more walk in the garden with God.

I challenge you to pause for at least 1/2 an hour today, and go on your own awe and wonder walk. Re-expose yourself to the wonder of God’s world and the delight God intends you to find in interacting with it.

Walk around your neighborhood. What catches your attention? It could be something as seemingly insignificant as an ant crossing the pavement. Where did it come from? Where is it going? What is its purpose? What would you name it? What do you learn about yourself and about God as you watch it. In what ways does it open you up to the awe and wonder of our world?
~Christine Sine from The Episcopal Cafe online blog

Dear Beloved Community:

This week, I want to share with you some thoughts on Holy Week.
April 10 – Passion Sunday (Palm Sunday)

This Sunday begins the holiest time of year for Christians. Holy Week, as a series of special and unique services, dates back to the late 3rd and 4th centuries. Palm Sunday, or more correctly, Passion Sunday begins with the Liturgy of the Palms where we remember Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem with shouts of “Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord. Hosanna in the highest” and then quickly moves into the telling of the Passion, this year as found in the Gospel of Luke, where Jesus is first brought before Pilate and at the finish will die crying in a loud voice, “Father, into your hands I commend my spirit.” It can produce a kind of spiritual whiplash. Tradition tells us that the reason for the blending of the two was because few people attended Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, or the Great Vigil of Easter services, so our spiritual ancestors made sure we would hear most of the story of Jesus’ last days in one sitting. If you would like to know more about Palm Sunday, click on this link below to watch a video made by Trinity Wall Street:

Please click here> Holy Week Explained: Palm Sunday.

April 13 – Holy Wednesday/Tenebrae Service

It isn’t a tradition to hold a Tenebrae service here at St. Gabriel, but I hope it is something many of you will attend. Tenebrae is a Latin word that means “darkness” or “shadows” and one of the more dramatic aspects of the service is that it begins with 15 candles being lit and then slowly being extinguished throughout the service until only one is left burning and the church is left in near darkness. This is to symbolize the apparent victory of evil until at the very end of the service a loud noise is heard symbolizing the earthquake at the time of the resurrection. In between all of this, there is the reading of Psalms, Canticles, and Scripture. It is a truly meditative experience. Trinity Wall Street has produced a video describing the service. It can be found here:

Please click here>Tenebrae Explained: Holy Week in the Shadows

April 14 – Maundy Thursday

Maundy Thursday begins what is known as the Paschal Triduum, the three great days of Easter. Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, and the Great Vigil of Easter is thought of as all one service which is why we leave the Maundy Thursday and Good Friday services in silence.

On Maundy Thursday we recall the Passover meal Jesus shared with his disciples, his washing of their feet, and his proclamation of the new commandment which is where the service gets its name from. Maundy comes from the Latin word mandatum which means “commandment.”

In John’s gospel, Jesus says, “you also ought to wash one another’s feet,” which we will do. Rather than have me as your priest wash everyone’s feet, we will be washing each other’s feet. I think this is because I, like all of you, are a disciple of Jesus and so I should not assume Jesus’s role (not because I don’t want to be washing a lot of people’s feet!). Here is Trinity Wall Street’s video:

Please click here>Holy Week Explained: Maundy Thursday

April 15 – Good Friday

On Good Friday, we once again experience the Passion of Jesus, this time from the Gospel of John. The altar will be bare, having been stripped the night before. We will pray the Solemn Collects which are divided into five sections that address the five major areas of life that intercessory prayer is designed to address: prayers are said seeking God’s aid for the Christian church, for all the nations of the world, for those sick and in need, for any not yet reached by the missionary efforts of the Church, and for the people who are praying, that they may act holily and live eternally. We will also take time to Venerate the Cross which is offered as a time to use our replica of the Cross as a way to focus our prayer and meditation on Jesus’ Passion. Here is Trinity Wall Street’s video:

Please click here>Holy Week Explained: Good Friday

I hope that many of you will take advantage of the opportunity to attend some if not all of these sacred services. Look for a post later in the week for the meaning of the Great Vigil of Easter and Easter Sunday.

In the peace and love of Christ,

Everett+

P.S. Don’t forget to be working on your Easter bonnets – everyone! You can use a baseball cap, a beanie, or a cowboy hat if the word bonnet is bothering you. Heck, you can even wear bunny ears!

Palm Sunday Community Egg Hunt

Sunday, April 10th at 3:00 pm SHARP

The hunt for prize-filled eggs happens outside (if conditions permit)
Dress for the weather with shoes or boots that can get dirty
Bring your own basket or borrow one of ours
Hunt is free and open to all kids through 5th grade-

Invite friends, neighbors, and family!

Afterwards we will hear a Holy Week story from Everett+
and award special prizes

St. Gabriel Episcopal Church 17435 NW West Union Rd. Portland, OR 97229

Put on by St. Gabriel’s Youth Group
image from villagerealtyobx
Donation Drop Off to Beaverton Resource Center:

Kathy Prenger and Vicki Fitzgerald of The Gabriel Center dropped off a wealth of donations from the people of our church to the Beaverton Resource Center on Wednesday including:

  • $218 worth of quarters for people to use the laundromat;
  • 1000+ diapers purchased with a grant from Thrivent Financial;
  • Two cases of shampoo;
  • Toilet paper and tissues;
  • Lots of “love and care”.
The church received a thank you letter from Lisa Mentesana from BRC thanking our congregation and saying “our resource center can only begin to help those in need with friends like you. By offering an array of social services in one location, we empower those dealing with hunger, homelessness, and poverty to create more stability and a permanent change for a better tomorrow.”

Easter Food Drive

Our next focus will be on a Youth-led food drive for individually packaged, microwavable lunches for PCC Rock Creek’s Panther Pantry free store at our Easter services.

We encourage you to bring individually- packaged microwavable lunch cups to donate to an Easter Service…..

…..Get an Easter candy and an affirmation
for each one!

=

Please bring donations to any of our three Easter services:
—-The Easter Vigil Sat. April 16th 8:00 pm
—-Easter Morning Sunday Services April 17th 8:00 and 10:00 am
Bring items such as: 
Instant soup cups
Mac & cheese, chili, pasta, beef stew cups
Ramen noodle cups
Instant oatmeal cups

All donations will go to PCC Rock Creek’s Panther Pantry free store for low-income HUNGRY college students

Food drive is being conducted by St. Gabriel’s Jr. and Sr. Youth Groups on behalf of the Gabriel Center’s Lenten Outreach and as part of the April Eco-challenge

 

A Message from Everett+

“I believe [this] states perfectly what we should be trying to become.

Please click here to view: https://youtu.be/MhOZv5i7CHY

Spencer LaJoye “Plowshare Prayer”

Plowshare Prayer

Dear blessed creator, dear mother, dear savior Dear father, dear brother, dear holy other

Dear sibling, dear baby, dear patiently waiting Dear sad and confused, dear stuck and abused

Dear end-of-your-rope, dear worn out and broke, Dear go-it-alone, dear running from home

Dear righteously angry, forsaken by family Dear jaded and quiet, dear tough and defiant

I pray that I’m heard And I pray that this works

I pray if a prayer has been used as a sword against you

and your heart, against you and your word I pray that this prayer is a plowshare, of sorts

that it might break you open, it might help you grow

I pray that your body gets all that it needs and if you don’t want healing,

I just pray for peace I pray that your burden gets lighter each day

I pray the mean voice in your head goes away I pray that you honor the grief as it comes

I pray you can feel all the life in your lungs I pray that if you go all day being brave

that you can go home, go to bed feeling safe I pray you’re forgiven, I pray you forgive

I pray you set boundaries and openly live I pray that you feel you are worth never leaving

I pray that you know I will always believe you I pray that you’re heard

and I pray that this works

Amen on behalf of the last and the least, on behalf of the anxious, depressed, and unseen

Amen for the workers, the hungry, the houseless Amen for the lonely and recently spouseless

Amen for the queers and their closeted peers Amen for the bullied who hold in their tears

Amen for the mothers of little Black sons Amen for the kids who grow up scared of guns

Amen for the addicts, the ashamed and hungover Amen for the calloused, the wizened, the sober

Amen for the ones who want life to be over Amen for the leaders who lose their composure

Amen for the parents who just lost their baby Amen for the chronically ill and disabled

Amen for the children down at the border Amen for the victims of our law and order

I pray that you’re heard and I pray that this works

I pray if a prayer has been used as a sword against you and your heart,

against you and your word, I pray that this prayer is a plowshare, of sorts

 

In the peace and love of Christ,
Everett+

Welcome to Lent 2022

In a short time, on Wednesday, March 2nd, we will hear the following words in the “Proper Liturgy for Ash Wednesday” from the Book of Common Prayer:

“Dear People of God: The first Christians observed with great devotion the days of our Lord’s passion and resurrection, and it became the custom of the Church to prepare for them by a
season of penitence and fasting. This season of Lent provided a time in which converts to the faith were prepared for Holy Baptism. It was also a time when those who, because of notorious sins, had been separated from the body of the faithful were reconciled by penitence and forgiveness, and restored to the fellowship of the Church. Thereby, the whole congregation was put in mind of the message of pardon and absolution set forth in the Gospel of our Savior, and of the need which all Christians continually have to renew their repentance and faith.

I invite you, therefore, in the name of the Church, to the observance of a holy Lent, by self-examination and repentance; by prayer, fasting, and self-denial; and by reading and meditating on God’s holy Word. And, to make a right beginning of repentance, and as a mark of our mortal nature, let us now kneel before the Lord, our maker and redeemer.” (BCP, 264 – 265)

The passage above from the BCP with its “notorious sins” and “separation from the body of the fellowship of the Church” can feel ominous and foreboding. Conversely, the ideas of fasting and self-denial (“This year I am giving up chocolate for Lent”) can almost sound like New Year’s resolutions to diet and exercise which by February are often forgotten.

Lent is an importance season in the life of the church and isn’t meant to be taken lightly but we should not forget the joy for which we are preparing, the “reason for the season” if you will.

One of the Proper Prefaces for the season of Lent captures this:

“You bid your faithful people cleanse their hearts and prepare with joy for the Paschal feast; that, fervent in prayer and in works of mercy, and renewed by your Word and Sacraments, they may come to the fullness of grace which you have prepared for those who love you.”
(BCP, 379)

We are called to prepare with joy for the Paschal feast! Cleansing our hearts through a variety of practices: intentional prayer, works of mercy, reading and meditating on God’s Holy Word. These are all ways we are called to observe Lent. So, I would suggest, if I may, that this Lent we worry less about giving things up and more about adding things to our lives to enrich and deepen our connection to our faith. Let these 40 days of Lent be a time to experiment with opening up more space in your daily life for expressions of your faith, knowing that the space you have opened will be filled with the glory of our risen Savior at the Paschal feast.

A blessed Lent to you all.

Everett+

Worship at St. Gabriel for Ash Wednesday, March 2nd, 2022

9:30 am Rite I Eucharist with the Imposition of Ashes in-person and online via Zoom

11:00 am- 12:00 pm “Ashes to Go” Drive-Through upper parking lot at church- call 503-645-0744 to let us know you are here or make a reservation

5:30- 6:30 pm “Ashes to Go” Drive-Through upper parking lot at church- no reservation needed

7:30 pm Ash Wednesday Liturgy without Holy Communion in-person and online via Zoom

 

 

Lenten image from media.istockphoto.com

St. Gabriel is excited to have the Episcopal Bishop of Oregon, The Rt. Rev. Diana Akiyama, visit our parish for the first time since she was consecrated on January 30, 2021 at Trinity Cathedral in Portland, Oregon.

Get to know our bishop! 
Bishop Akiyama was born in Wheeler, Oregon and grew up in a Japanese American community in Hood River. Bishop Akiyama was the first Japanese American woman ordained to the priesthood in The Episcopal Church in 1989 by the Rt. Rev. Rustin Kimsey, Diocese of Eastern Oregon. She holds a Ph.D. in Religion and Social Ethics from the University of Southern California (2001), a M.Div. from Church Divinity School of the Pacific, Berkeley (1988), and a B.S. from the University of Oregon (1981). Before returning to Oregon to serve as our 11th bishop, she served as the Vicar at St. Augustine’s Episcopal Church in Kapaau, Hawai’i and as Dean at Waiolaihui’ia School of Formation for the Episcopal Diocese of Hawai’i.

Bishop Akiyama’s passion for living into the charisms of preaching, teaching, and the sacerdotal work of the priesthood continues to form her as a spiritual leader. Speaking the truth in love expressed through authenticity, trustworthiness, compassion and clarity of vision are the hallmarks of her spiritual leadership. “I am energized when my leadership helps communities to shift assumptions, restore expectations, and imagine a new way forward. Listening with empathy, courage and openness allows me to walk with individuals and communities to connect their deepest yearnings with God’s call,” Bishop Akiyama stated.

Her gifts as a spiritual leader find their fullest expression in work centered on discerning how God is calling each of us to participate in the Beloved Community. She is continually awed by the Holy Spirit’s activity in and through each of us and will continue this work in the various opportunities to walk with the people of the Diocese of Oregon.


Donate to the Bishop’s Discretionary Fund 
In honor of her visit and important work, please consider a gift to The Bishop’s Discretionary Fund. “The funds are used to assist those studying for ordained ministry and aid clergy families in a difficult financial situation”. Checks may be made out to St Gabriel’s with the notation:  “Bishop’s Discretionary Fund.”


We Need Ushers & Acolytes for the 10:00 am Service
We are looking for 2 ushers and acolytes to serve for the 10:00 am service on Sunday, February 20th with the bishop. You can contact Canon Linda or the church office if you can help.


We Will be Celebrating a Baptism!
We are looking forward to witnessing the bishop baptize a 2-year-old from our congregation at the Sunday, February 20th 10:00 am service. Church school students will be brought into the sanctuary from the classrooms to be witnesses, although they will be watching and waving their baptism wands from a safe distance away rather than be crowded around the baptismal font due to Covid guidelines.


Pick Up a Baptismal Wand to Wave Over Zoom
If you will be attending the February 20th 10:00 am service at home via Zoom rather than attending in-person, pick up a baptismal wand at church this Sunday Feb. 13th or outside on the bench by the church entrance anytime next week. Wave it at the screen along with the congregation when Clara is baptized!

Biography and images from the Diocese of Oregon website, wand image from cdn.diys.com

Notes from Canon Linda from St. Gabriel’s Annual Parish Meeting Report
January 30, 2022

Beloved of God, members of St. Gabriel the Archangel church,

I am offering to you this reflection as your Interim Rector. It is unlike any report that I have ever delivered to a congregation. The idea came to me as I was reviewing this past year with you and realizing how many of you I have not even met face to face. I submit to you the life of this parish as exhibited through the headlines in the weekly Messenger. This report is not in chronological order, it will not cluster ministry activities together, nor is it comprehensive (as I am sure that there are items that could be added to this montage). It is a window in time of the life of one unique congregation and I want to center this window in the verses from Jeremiah that we used for the 2021 Stewardship Campaign:

“For surely, I know the plans I have for you, says the Lord, plans for your welfare and not for harm, to give you a future with hope” Jeremiah 29:11

WINDOWS INTO THE LIFE OF ST GABRIEL
St Gabriel’s Mutual Ministry Review Gathering – where we have been, where we are and where we are going
Outdoor Eucharist- July 4th – attend in person or online – shared lunch to follow
The Four Quests of Jesus by Bishop Steven Charleston – summer book study on Native American traditions
Outreach Field Trip to Beaverton Resource Center
Profile Booklet approved by Vestry
Reopening Guidelines for in- person worship
St Gabriel’s website is fresh, new and ONLINE
St Gabriel’s Choir Has a New Storage Closet!
Our Playground is Ready for Play!
Service of Lament to Remember the Victims of Indian Boarding Schools
We Had LIVE MUSIC in the Sanctuary
Highlights from the 133rd Episcopal Diocese of Oregon Convention
Search Committee is Making Progress
“Clothes for Kids” Needs Donations of New Socks and Underwear
Our “Friendship Circle” for 55+ Starts this Thursday – Let’s Have Fun Together
FORWARD DAY BY DAY – devotional booklets available
St Gabriel College Student Starts GoFundMe for Afghan Refugees
Meet St. Gabriel’s New Youth Minister!
A Message from Bishop Akiyama – Making Community and Connection Through Cooperation
Deacon Greg Rainey is Headed for a New Deaconate Position
Drive-Through Eucharist this Sunday
Outreach Shopping Field Trip Planned for 4th – 7th Graders
DO NOT MISS Our St Francis Services, Sunday, October 3 – Our Own St. Francis and the Wolf
The Gospel for Kids for Sunday – Did Jesus Make Mistakes?
All Saints Welcomed Back on All Saints Sunday – Soup for the Saints Smashing Success
Ways to Help Our Hungry Neighbor

I invite you to look through these WINDOWS – how have you been part of what you see? What do you hope to SEE in the future? What WINDOWS will you help to create in this New Year. Encourage, love and pray for one another as you share the GOOD NEWS OF CHRIST’S LOVE within the church and out into the community.

With confidence in the ministry of God’s future of hope,
Canon Linda

Let’s Move From Surviving to Thriving
TOGETHER
at Our Annual Church Meeting
THIS SUNDAY 

January 30th 11:30 am

Church members please plan on attending our Annual Meeting of St. Gabriel the Archangel either in-person or online via Zoom this Sunday, January 30th starting after our 10:00 am service at 11:30 am. All church members over 18 are invited to participate and vote, with children, youth, and others welcome as observers.

Important business is conducted at these meetings, and by attending you will learn about the “state of the church” including our 2022 budget, a review of last year, plans for this year, and voting for new members of the vestry and convention delegates. It’s vital that you participate to be heard, to be knowledgeable, and to keep our church community strong- together!

All those who attend in-person will be expected to observe Covid protocols including being vaccinated, wearing a mask, sitting in family pods and distancing from others, using hand sanitizer, and washing hands frequently.

Although we usually like to provide brunch or lunch for in-person participants, due to the current state of the Covid Omicron variant, we don’t feel it is safe to serve a group meal at this time. There will be coffee, water, and very light snacks served.

To get the Zoom link to join the Annual Meeting online, please call the church office after 8:00 am Sunday morning at 503-645-0744.

The booklet and any other materials for the meeting are available via a link to a Google folder here. Printed copies will also be available at the church.

Look forward to seeing you there!

image from canstockphotos.com

I would never have thought that COVID would play such a large part in our lives as a congregation as we go through this period of transition. Just today, Page Clothier and I had to make the difficult decision to suspend the nursery, church school, and youth group until February. We will continue to have in-person worship and offer Zoom as a worship option.

I think of the challenges we have faced and overcome, and the incredible love the members of this congregation have for one another, and I am reminded that the Holy Spirit is strong in this place and strong in each of us. I ask you all to take whatever steps are necessary for you to remain safe and secure. Please don’t hesitate to reach out if you are in any need or even if you just want to talk. Know that the blessing of God Almighty, the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit, is with you and will remain with you always.

In the love of Christ, Everett+

The Rev. Everett Charters

Assisting Priest
St. Gabriel the Archangel Episcopal Church
17435 NW West Union Road
503-645-0744
Portland, OR 97229

St. Gabriel’s continued our great tradition of having our children’s play not on Christmas Eve, but on the next Sunday- this year January 2nd. Our play was “A Gift from St. Francis” about the first creche with live animals in 1228 based on the children’s book by Joanna Cole. We had live music and children, youth, adults, and dogs in the cast! Deacon Greg and Father Everett reprised their St. Francis and The Wolf roles from St. Francis Day, and Canon Linda played our dove. We had great narrators, actors, and musicians. Thank you to everyone who participated- it was absolutely wonderful!

To view the play on YouTube, please go here and start at 20:46.

Actors getting ready to enter the sanctuary

St. Francis surprised by The Wolf

The entire creche scene

A donkey, a dove and St. Francis

Our musicians Abby and Michael

The congregation puts pieces of straw in Jesus’ manger

St. Gabriel’s Christmastide Play

“A Gift from St. Francis”

The story of the first creche in Italy in 1223

Sunday, January 2nd, 2022

8:00 am live reading

10:00 am full performance,
with live music, kids, youth, adults, and DOGS in the cast!

All are welcome- please join us!

If your child would like to be part of the play but missed the rehearsals, please see or contact Page and they can still be a sheep, even the morning of the play! page@stgabrielpdx.org

NOTE: If you have an allergy to dogs, you might consider attending the 8:00 am reading or attending the 10:00 am service online on Zoom

NOTE: Due to concern over the spread of the Omicron Covid variant, we will not be able to gather for food and fellowship after the service as previously planned to celebrate the ministry at St. Gabriel, but please wish him well!

This is the final week of Extended Advent leading to Christmas at St. Gabriel’s, and Sunday December 19th is the beginning of Extended Advent Week 7. Here is our Advent and Christmas Family Activity Calendar, our prayers for families, and our traditional prayers for the seventh week of Extended Advent and Christmas.

Family Advent Activity Calendar for December 19-25, 2021

Sun. Dec. 19th Today is the 7th Sun. of Advent. Jesus will be born very soon! Gather around your Advent wreath and light all the candles but the white one. Say the 7th week prayers. Look up the word “Emmanuel” online or in a dictionary. What does it mean?
Mon. Dec. 20th Get out your art supplies and make place cards with everyone’s name who will be at your dinner table on Christmas. As you make each one, say a little prayer for the person you are making it for.
Tues. Dec. 21st Tonight is the winter solstice. When it gets dark, go outside, and look at the stars. Can you imagine how bright the Star of Bethlehem must have shined to lead the wise men to baby Jesus? Come back inside and read Matthew 2:1-12.                                                                                                                                    Wed. Dec. 22nd John the Baptist said, “If you have two coats, give one to the poor. If you have extra food, give it away to those who are hungry. (Luke 3:11). What could you donate to those who are needy?               Thu. Dec. 23rd Last chance for secret elf good deeds! Have you done something thoughtful for everyone in your family? If not, this is the day to do that. At the end of the day at dinner time, go ahead and reveal the elf was you all along!
Fri. Dec. 24th It’s Christmas Eve! Dress up and go to church if you can at 4:30 pm. When you get home, light the white candle in your Advent wreath and read the passage in your prayer book to remember what happened in a manger in Bethlehem so long ago that changed everything.
Sat. Dec. 25th Today is Jesus’ birthday! Have fun giving and opening your presents, and then ay a prayer to thank God for all your blessings, the love of your family and friends, and for sending Jesus to us. REJOICE! Ring the little bell from your treasure bag to celebrate!

Extended Advent Prayers for Families with Children:
7th Sunday of Extended Advent – Emmanuel   12/19/21 and the Christmas Reading for Christmas Eve or Christmas Day

 

(Light all the purple candles and the pink candle)

We are in the time

when our nights are growing longer,

and our days are getting short.

Yes, it can seem cold and dark.

But–when we light the candles 

nestled in the green branches,

we see light shining through the darkness

and we remember what God promised us: 

Jesus is coming! 

 

We are all very busy and want to be served.  

Dear Jesus, help us to remember

that you want us to lead by serving others first.

Help us to be good servants,

to help each other,

and be kind to each other,

always. 

We are waiting.  Amen.

WAYS TO HELP Support Essential Workers: 

  • Support legislation to raise the minimum wage so essential workers can support their families with a 40 hour work week. 
  • Understand that many service industries such as restaurants, delivery and shipping services, grocery and retail stores, government agencies, and health care facilities are short-staffed and struggling to deal with that situation. Be kind and patient with those workers who cared enough to show up and are doing their best to help. 
  • Tip generously.
  • Allow enough time to run errands, keep appointments, and receive deliveries, expecting that many such experiences may take longer than usual. 

Christmas Eve 12/24/21 or Christmas Day 12/24/21

(Light all the candles including the white one.)

Long ago, the Emperor of Rome Caesar Augustus ordered that all the people in the empire needed to be counted. Everyone went to the town they were born in to be counted.  Joseph went to the town of Bethlehem. He went with Mary. Joseph and Mary were engaged, and Mary was expecting a child. 

When Joseph and Mary got to Bethlehem, it was time for Mary to have the baby. Mary gave birth to her son Jesus and wrapped him in blankets. She laid Jesus in a manger, near the barn animals because there was no room for them to stay in the inn.

Nearby there were sheepherders living in the fields with the sheep they took care of. The sheepherders were watching over their flock of sheep during the night. Suddenly, God’s angel Gabriel appeared in the field! Bright light and God’s glory shone all around them. They were so scared! 

The angel said, “Do not be afraid! God sent me to tell you that a great and joyful thing has happened that is meant for everyone in the entire world: a Savior has been born in Bethlehem. Go there and look for a baby wrapped in blankets and lying in a manger.”

Then a huge choir of angels appeared. The sheepherders were so surprised! The angels sang:

“Glory to God in heaven,

Peace to all men and women on earth.”

Then the angels rose up to heaven and disappeared. The sheepherders talked over what had just happened. They said, “Let’s get over to Bethlehem as fast as we can and see what the Lord has told us about.”

Even though the angel had told them about the new Savior, it was hard for them to believe until they saw baby Jesus there in the manger!

The sheepherders told everyone they met what the angels had said about the new baby. Everyone was full of wonder when they heard the good news. 

Mary listened to all these words of praise and joy and thought hard about them, keeping them deep in her heart.  

The sheepherders returned to their sheep and were so excited! They told everyone telling everyone how wonderful it was that Jesus had been born and that he had been sent by God, just like what God had promised. 

Our wait is over, Jesus is here!

 (Story based on Luke 2:1-20)

Extended Advent Traditional Prayers:

7th Sunday of Extended Advent – Emmanuel   12/19/21

(Light all the purple candles and the pink candle)

Leader: As our nights grow longer and our days grow short, we look on these earthly signs–light and green branches– and remember God’s promise to our world: Christ, our Light and our Hope, will come. Listen to the words of the gospel of Matthew:

 … an angel of the Lord appeared to him in a dream and said ‘Joseph, son of David, do not be afraid to take Mary as your wife, for the child conceived in her is from the Holy Spirit.  She will bear a son, and you are to name him Jesus, for he will save his people from their sins.’  All this took place to fulfill what had been spoken by the Lord through the prophet: ‘Look, the virgin shall conceive and bear a son, and they shall name him Emmanuel,’ which means, ‘God is with us.’”        (Matthew 1:20b-23)

 Candle is lit while All sing:

O come, o come, Emmanuel, and ransom captive Israel, that mourns in lonely exile here until the Son of God appear. Rejoice!  Rejoice! Emmanuel shall come to thee, O Israel! 

Leader: Let us pray.

 All:  Eternal God, you do not abandon us in exile but hear our plea for returning and rest: Visit us, we pray, with your presence and raise us to greet with hope and joy the promised day of salvation;

through Jesus Christ, who with you and the Holy Spirit, lives and reigns  now and for ever. Amen.

  WAYS TO HELP Support Essential Workers: 

  • Support legislation to raise the minimum wage so essential workers can support their families with a 40 hour work week. 
  • Understand that many service industries such as restaurants, delivery and shipping services, grocery and retail stores, government agencies, and health care facilities are short-staffed and struggling to deal with that situation. Be kind and patient with those workers who cared enough to show up and are doing their best to help. 
  • Tip generously.
  • Allow enough time to run errands, keep appointments, and receive deliveries, expecting that many such experiences may take longer than usual.                                

 

 

image from worshipshopmedia.com

Dear Friends,

By now, most of you have heard that Bishop Akiyama has made my next assignment. This prompts me to offer you a few thoughts that have come to me in prayer and reflection.

First, thank you all for making my assignment to St. Gabriel the Archangel such a substantive and joyful ministry! So many of you were there from the beginning for my ordination, and you welcomed me the moment I walked through the doors. A foundational aspect of my ministry as a deacon is to support everyone in their own ministries and together, despite many challenges, we have felt and lived God’s love in our community. I am grateful to have served with every one of you during my time at St. Gabriel. I also deeply appreciate the support and wisdom of the fellow clergy with whom I have worked here, including the deacons on whose shoulders I stand, Katherine, Tom, and Roger, as well as priests Canon Linda, Father Everett, and Mother LouAnn.

During the isolation in which we’ve lived for much of that time, we’ve had to learn how to be Church over Zoom. Thankfully, this has kept us connected while physically apart for safety but it is not the same thing as worshiping and fellowshipping in person. Yet, for all its constraints of microphones accidentally left on or muted, time lags, and dropped connections, I am so grateful that, although apart, we can still interact. This is a marked contrast from most of the services I have participated in with other congregations, which have been one-way broadcasts. I’ll take our quirky two-way internet interaction over that approach every time! This community has shown resilience and commitment to serving God and each other despite all of these challenges, remembering that, with God, all things are possible.

Deacons serve where our bishop assigns us, although each bishop has their own preferences about assignments. When I was sent to you, the thinking regarding first deacon assignments was that they would often be one year in length. Additionally, deacons often are expected to depart in connection with the departure of the rector. A year ago, with all of our changes, the then-archdeacon and I agreed that I’d stay at St Gabriel for a second year. Although well past that mark, Canon Linda and I agreed that we wanted me to stay through Christmas Day. So, I will preach on December 26th at our single 9 am service and I will wrap up my ministry with you by reprising my blessing of the animals role as St Francis for our Christmastide play. You’ll have to come to see if Fr. Everett again appears as the wolf!

I hope that you have found my ministry among you to be fruitful. If so, feel free to encourage your new rector to request a new deacon!

For me, leaving the many relationships we’ve built in my time with you makes leaving difficult. And the departure of clergy can feel somewhat abrupt, potentially making this leavetaking feel more difficult. For my part, this feels a bit like getting ready to go to sea: I feel a mixture of pain at leaving people I love, joy at what we have done together, and excitement at what is yet to be revealed. And, although I am going to a new congregation, I can’t wait to see what else is revealed among God’s beloved people of St. Gabriel!

In God’s Love,
Deacon Greg

We are continuing to observe Extended Advent at St. Gabriel’s, and Sunday December 12th is the beginning of Extended Advent Week 6. Here is our Advent Family Activity Calendar, our prayers for families, and our traditional prayers for the sixth week of Extended Advent.

Family Advent Activity Calendar for December 12-18, 2021

Sun. Dec. 12th Today is the 6th Sun. of Advent. Gather with your family around the Advent wreath and light 5 purple candles and the pink one. Afterwards, cut a star out of white, yellow, or gold paper and hang it somewhere to remember the Star of Bethlehem.
Mon. Dec. 13th Have you thought of how you could thank your teachers this holiday season? A handwritten letter of appreciation would be the best gift you could give.
Tues. Dec. 14th Another secret elf good deed day! Pick another person in your family and do something nice for them without them knowing who did it. Jesus will bless your kindness.
Wed. Dec. 15th Have you eaten a candy cane yet? Some say the shape is to remind us of Joseph’s or the shepherds’ crooks they carried in the fields or on journeys but hold the candy cane by the stem hanging down and it forms a letter. What important word starts with that letter that is important in Advent and always?
Thu. Dec. 16th Bundle up and take a walk tonight with your grownups and look at the festive lights decorating your neighborhood. When you look at the lights, remember that Jesus is the light of the world.
Fri. Dec. 17th What is your favorite Christmas carol? Practice it so you remember the words. Suggest a sing-along with your family. (Ephesians 5:19)
Sat. Dec. 18th Tonight there is a full moon- go outside and look at it. Do you think it will ever snow?

Extended Advent Prayers for Families with Children:
6th Sunday of Advent – The Morning Star   12/12/21

(Light 5 purple candles and the pink candle)

We are in the time

when our nights are growing longer,

and our days are getting short.

Yes, it can seem cold and dark.

But–when we light the candles 

nestled in the green branches,

we see light shining through the darkness

and we remember what God promised us: 

Jesus is coming!

Dear God,  

When I see the stars in the sky,

and the deep blue ocean, 

and the tall, green trees,

and bees in the flowers,

I know you gave us a gift

and you need us to care for it. 

Show me how.  

We are waiting. Amen.

WAYS TO HELP Our Earth: 

  • Keep doing all the things you already do like recycling, avoiding one-use serving ware and food storage, driving less/walking more, planting low watering plants in your yard, conserving water and electricity, and so on. 
  • Consider moving from meat and dairy-based foods to plant-based foods 3-5 days a week.
  • As an adult avoid buying cheap clothing and fast fashion and try to invest in higher quality pieces.  Pass on outgrown children’s clothing to another family and accept the same for your child.
  • Take care with the use of fire in the forest and grasslands.
  • Read out loud and discuss a Bible passage about caring for the earth every day this week as a family:
    • Genesis 1:26; Genesis 1:28; Genesis 2:25; Genesis 8:22; Revelation 7:1-17; Psalm 63:1-11; Isaiah 45:18. Prayer in BCP page 827.

Extended Advent Traditional Prayers:

6th Sunday of Advent – The Morning Star   12/12/21

(Light 5 purple candles and the pink candle)

Leader: As our nights grow longer and our days grow short, we look on these earthly signs–light and green branches– and remember God’s promise to our world: Christ, our Light and our Hope, will come. Listen to the words of Malachi the prophet:

 “See, the day is coming, burning like an oven, when all the arrogant and all evildoers will be stubble; the day that comes shall burn them up, says the Lord of hosts, so that it will leave them neither root nor branch.  But for you who revere my name the sun of righteousness shall rise, with healing in its wings.  You shall go out leaping like calves from the stall.  And you shall tread down the wicked, for they will be ashes under the soles of your feet, on the day when I act, says the Lord of hosts.”        (Malachi 4:1-3)

Candle is lit while All sing: 

O come, thou Dayspring from on high, and cheer us by thy drawing nigh; disperse the gloomy clouds of night, and death’s dark shadow put to flight. Rejoice!  Rejoice! Emmanuel shall come to thee, O Israel!

Leader: Let us pray.

 All:  Lord Jesus Christ, in your resurrection you appeared as the Morning Star that knows no setting: Dawn upon the darkness of the human heart so that the deathly orders of this world may be overcome and your whole creation made new; for with the Father and the Holy Spirit, you live and reign, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

 WAYS TO HELP Our Earth: 

  • Keep doing all the things you already do like recycling, avoiding one-use serving ware and food storage, driving less/walking more, planting low watering plants in your yard, conserving water and electricity, and so on. 
  • Consider moving from meat and dairy-based foods to plant-based foods 3-5 days a week.
  • Avoid buying cheap clothing and fast fashion and try to invest in higher quality pieces or shop in thrift stores. Pass on outgrown children’s clothing to another family and accept the same for your child.
  • Take care with the use of fire in the forest and grasslands.
  • Read out loud and discuss a Bible passage about caring for the earth every day this week as a family:

Genesis 1:26; Genesis 1:28; Genesis 2:25; Genesis 8:22; Revelation 7:1-17; Psalm 63:1-11; Isaiah 45:18. Prayer in BCP page 827.

image from farm4.staticflickr.com

We are continuing to observe Extended Advent at St. Gabriel’s, and Sunday December 5th is the beginning of Extended Advent Week 5. Here is our Advent Family Activity Calendar, our prayers for families, and our traditional prayers for the fifth week of Extended Advent.

Family Advent Activity Calendar for December 5-12, 2021

Sun. Dec. 5th   Today is the 5th Sun. of Advent. Gather with your family around the Advent wreath and light 5 purple candles and say the prayers for week 5. Make sure Jesus has the key to unlock your heart and fill it with love!

Mon. Dec. 6th Today is St. Nicholas Day. Did you know Santa Claus was a saint? He was the Bishop of Myra in the year 342 and is the patron saint of children. Remember him by making a gift for someone you love today. 

Tues. Dec. 7th Are you remembering to move the Wise Ones closer to your Nativity set every day? They have such a long way to go yet! Do you remember the 3 gifts they were carrying to baby Jesus?

Wed. Dec. 8th Secret elf good deed day! Secretly choose a family member to do something nice for. Don’t tell- for now it’s just between you and God. 

Thu. Dec. 9th Look up a world map on the computer or atlas. Ask your grownup to show you a place where there is war or suffering. ray for their safety, comfort, and peace on earth. 

Fri. Dec. 10th Ask a grownup to help you make each of you a cup of hot chocolate with marshmallows and a candy cane stirrer. Yum! 

Sat. Dec. 11th Spread a blanket next to your Christmas tree and have a picnic dinner next to it. After dinner turn off all the lights except for on the tree and have each family member read John 8:12 with a flashlight.  

Advent Prayers for Families with Children

5th Sunday of Advent – Key of David   

(Light 5 purple candles.)

We are in the time

when our nights are growing longer,

and our days are getting short.

Yes, it can seem cold and dark.

But–when we light the candles 

nestled in the green branches,

we see light shining through the darkness

and we remember what God promised us: 

Jesus is coming! 

 

God, help us to remember

that for a medical emergency, 

or a job loss, or just bad luck, 

we could be in other people’s shoes.  

God, please unlock my heart

and come to the aid of those who need me. 

We are waiting. Amen.

 

WAYS TO HELP The Homeless and the Hungry: 

    • Support needy families in the Beaverton School District through The Gabriel Center by donating clothing anytime; and instant food, laundry detergent pods, school supplies, or whatever is requested each month.  
    • Drop off non-perishable food to an Oregon Food Bank partner Rock Creek Church by Westview High School at 4470 NW 185TH Ave. Portland, OR 97229 in their drop-off box.
  • Keep supplies like clean socks, water bottles, non-perishable snacks, and warm gloves in your car to give to people on highway ramps and in parking lot entries.re
  • Support eviction moratoriums during the pandemic.
  • Prayer in BCP for the Poor and Neglected on page 826.

Advent Prayers for Adults: 5th Sunday of Advent– Key of David

(Light 5 purple candles)

Leader: As our nights grow longer and our days grow short, we look on these earthly signs–light and green branches–and remember God’s promise to our world: Christ, our Light and our Hope, will come. Listen to the words of Isaiah the prophet:
“I will commit your authority to his hand, and he shall be a father to the inhabitants of Jerusalem and to the house of Judah. I will place on his shoulder the key of the house of David; he shall open, and no one shall shut; he shall shut, and no one shall open.” (Isaiah 22:21b-23)

Candle is lit while All sing:
O come, thou Key of David, come, and open wide our heavenly home; make safe the way that leads on high, and close the path to misery. Rejoice! Rejoice! Emmanuel shall come to thee, O Israel!

Leader: Let us pray.

All: Gracious God, your Son Jesus Christ opened wide the gate of heaven, making plain the way that leads to eternal joy: Grant that we who have been buried with Christ in baptism and raised to new life may strive courageously for the freedom and peace of the world; through your Son, Jesus Christ,
teach us in her ways to go. Rejoice! Rejoice!
Emmanuel shall come to thee, O Israel!

Leader: Let us pray.

All: Eternal God, your Word of wisdom goes forth and does not return empty: Grant us such knowledge and love of you that we may perceive your presence in all creation and every creature; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who with you and the Holy Spirit lives and reigns, now and forever. Amen.

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A Sermon by Rev. Everett Charters
from November 21, 2021

I come to this sermon painfully aware how much I don’t know about the events we are lamenting tonight.

How much I don’t know about the children, the families, the communities, the nations that were victims of this attempted genocide by our government and our society.

The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum defines genocide as:
an internationally recognized crime where acts are committed
with the intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnic, racial, or religious group.
These acts fall into five categories:
Killing members of the group
Causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group
Deliberately inflicting on the group condition of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part
Imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group
Forcibly transferring children of that group to another group

That definition chills my soul and to think this is what occurred in this country to Native peoples.

Notice I said Native people, not Native Americans or American Indians.

The majority of words used in the English language to refer to Native peoples have been weaponized.

Indian or worse American Indian is such destructive nomenclature – beginning with the fact that it is nomenclature – the devising or choosing of names for things or for someone – does anyone believe that Native peoples decided to call themselves American Indians?

No, that was something Europeans decided to call them.

To say Native American implies that there was an America before the first Europeans arrived here. There wasn’t.

In our Scripture, to name something is to have dominion over it – remember Genesis 1:26, God gave Adam dominion over and Genesis 2:19 & 20, where Adam was given the power to name everything.

Naming and dominion.

Is it really our God given right to name things? To name people?

Perhaps the most harmful words spoken with regards to the victims of the boarding schools were “Kill the Indian, save the man.” Words written by Brigadier General Richard Henry Pratt, who opened the Carlisle Indian Industrial School in Carlisle, Pennsylvania in 1879, the first government-run boarding school for Native children in the United States and the model upon which the boarding school system would be based.

The reason we called this a service in remembrance of the victims of the Indian Boarding Schools is because that is what they were called by those established them and we used that language because a key part of our lament is recognizing how language was weaponized and used as a tool of genocide.

Native children were punished, even beaten, when they tried to speak their language at the Boarding Schools. As a result, that language was often forgotten, so that when the children finally, were allowed to return home, they often could not speak or understand the language of their families anymore.

Imagine not understanding when your mother or father said, “I love you.” “I’ve missed you.” “Welcome home.”

This is just a part of what we, as white people, carried with us, when we walked into tonight’s service or at any time we attempt to enter into the culture of any of the myriad of tribal communities that are a part of the 574 federally recognized Native nations.

Even that is a term of conquest.

Federally recognized – the federal government decides who is a Native person – a predominantly white federal government.

This is why I know how much I don’t know about the lives of the peoples we are lamenting tonight.

So, what do I know?

I do know that I, that we, try to live each day of our lives as disciples of Jesus.

I know that our Baptismal Covenant is the guide we use to try to live that life.

I know that that Covenant compels us to seek and serve Christ in all persons, to love our neighbors as ourselves, to strive for justice and peace among all people, and to respect the dignity of every human being.

I know that there is one Body and one Spirit; that there is one hope in God’s call to us; that there is One Lord, One Faith, one Baptism, One God and Father of all.

And I know that the fullness of God’s love, and of God’s grace is something beyond humanity’s ability to comprehend and that that love has and continues to reconcile all things that it would otherwise be impossible to.

This is a difficult thing we are doing – listening to and learning the stories of children who were taken away from their families by people who looked like most of us.

There is no way, we alone, can make amends for what has been done to generations of Native peoples.

It is simply beyond our ability to do because we have learned that the wound is too deep.

We are powerless and yet, with God’s help we must still try.

So, we lament.

Lamenting, as we are doing tonight, is a part of learning the truth and about being honest with one another about what has been done.

But lamenting is not static, lamenting is dynamic which means it moves and changes.

Tonight, when we lament, we start in a place of sorrow, of guilt, of misunderstanding, of ignorance.

We lament what we don’t know. And we lament what we have learned.

And then we can begin to move towards another place where we lament for forgiveness but without the expectation of being forgiven.

And we lament not only with words but with actions.

We lament so that we can listen without prejudice to the truth in the lamenting of those who have been harmed. Then, we lament for reconciliation. We lament for what we do not deserve. We lament for the patience to wait with openness. We lament without expectation but we also lament with trust. Trust that our God is a loving God. Trust that Jesus through his life, death, resurrection, and ascension both reconciled and made reconciliation possible.

The Black Lives Matter movement and the work of anti-racism has introduced into our awareness the idea of the ally.

An ally doesn’t lead, an ally supports using their power and their influence in the way that they are told to best use it to fight against racism.

Native peoples don’t need us to tell them how to heal from inter-generational trauma.

They don’t need us to identify their problems for them.

In fact, they don’t need us to tell them anything about their experiences or their needs.

What we can offer, the way we can participate in reconciliation, is to be the ally.

Put our white privilege to work to support the self-identified needs and desires of Native peoples.

In a documentary on the inter-generational trauma of the boarding schools and the enforced removal of Native children from their families, Daniel Nelson Fox, a member of the Wikwemikong First Nation – who was himself taken from his family – talks about the resilience of Native peoples.

After more than 400 years of suffering repeated attempts of genocide, Native peoples, he says, are still here and will always be here.

Native peoples don’t need us to save them.

They aren’t asking us to save them.

They are asking, as so many peoples who have suffered at the hands of white supremacy have, for us to use the power and the privilege we hold as a result of their suffering to dismantle the systems, laws, and institutions that were created for the express purpose of securing white domination over Native peoples. And we don’t have to figure out how to do that.

What we need to do is listen…with humility and then act. We ask, “What needs to change?” and we are told, “This is what needs to change,”

So, we lower our heads, pray to God for strength, and get to work.

This is how we live out our baptismal covenant.

This is how we show we are disciples of Jesus.

This is how we turn lamentation into reconciliation.

 

See the entire service from Sunday, November 21, 2021 on YouTube here.

Painting by Bobby Von Martin, Choctaw Nation

We are continuing to observe Extended Advent at St. Gabriel’s, and Sunday November 28th is the beginning of Extended Advent Week 4. Here is our Advent Family Activity Calendar, our prayers for families, and our traditional prayers for the fourth week of Extended Advent.

Family Advent Activity Calendar for Nov. 28- Dec. 4, 2021

Sun. Nov. 28th Today is the 4th Sunday of Advent. Gather around your Advent wreath- you may need to replace some of the greens with fresh ones. Light 4 purple candles and say the prayers for week 4. Think how excited Mary and Joseph were with their baby only a month away!                                                                        Mon. Nov. 29th Hanukkah starts today for our Jewish friends. Hear and see the story by watching a video on YouTube here: http://bitly.ws/geNK.
Tues. Nov. 30th Jesus, help remind me each day that of all the wonderful gifts of Advent, you are the best one.
Wed. Dec. 1st For many families, this is the day to start decorating the house for the holidays. What is your favorite decoration? Ask if you can find a special place for it.
Thu. Dec. 2nd Say this prayer: Dear God, sometimes I get caught up in the excitement of the season. Give me strength to resist thinking only about gifts I want and think more about the gift of Jesus being born. Amen.
Fri. Dec. 3rd Make sure you have an angel decoration on your tree in honor of St. Gabriel. If you don’t have one, make one and hang it. Read what St. Gabriel said to Mary in Luke 1:26-38.
Sat. Dec. 4th This would be a good day to bake some holiday cookies! Which is your favorite? Bake them and drop some off to an elderly neighbor.

Advent Prayers for Families with Children

4th Sunday of Advent– Root of Jesse 11/28/21
(Light 4 purple candles)

We are in the time
when our nights are growing longer,
and our days are getting short.
Yes, it can seem cold and dark.
But–when we light the candles
nestled in the green branches,
we see light through the darkness
and we remember what God promised us:
Jesus is coming!

Dear God,
Some of us are weary of online learning.
Many of us miss our friends and being in school.
Help us find ways to learn while being safe.
Protect our teachers and school staff.
Let some of us learn online if we feel safer that way.
Show us, Jesus, the greatest teacher of all, the way.
We are waiting. Amen.

WAYS TO HELP Children at School:
Get your child vaccinated if they are eligible, and encourage others to do so as well.
Teach your child how to wear a mask safely and provide them with several clean ones each day when they attend school. Model mask-wearing yourself.
Continue to encourage hand washing with soap.
Pack small hand sanitizers in your child’s backpack for when hand washing with soap isn’t available.
Keep your child home if they feel or seem sick.
Ahead of the sniffles, know where you can get your child a PCR or diagnostic Covid test quickly. Check with your pediatrician to see if they have them available.
Prayer in BCP for the care of children on page 829.

Advent Prayers for Adults

4th Sunday of Advent–Root of Jesse 11/28/21

(Light 4 purple candles)

Leader: As our nights grow longer and our days grow short, we look on these earthly signs–light and green branches–and remember God’s promise to our world: Christ, our Light and our Hope, will come. Listen to the words of Isaiah the prophet:
“A shoot shall come out from the stump of Jesse, and a branch shall grow out of his roots. The spirit of the Lord shall rest on him, the spirit of counsel and might, the spirit of knowledge and the fear of the Lord. His delight shall be in the fear of the Lord. He shall not judge by what his eyes see, or decide by what his ears hear; but with righteousness he shall judge the poor, and decide with equity for the meek of the earth….The wolf shall live with the lamb, the leopard shall lie down with the kid, the calf and the lion and the fatling together, and a little child shall lead them….They will not hurt or destroy on all my holy mountain; for the earth will be full of the knowledge of the Lord as the waters cover the sea. On that day the root of Jesse shall stand as a signal to the peoples; the nations shall inquire of him, and his dwelling shall be glorious.” (Isaiah 11:1-4a, 6, 9-10)

Candle is lit while All sing:
O come, thou Branch of Jesse’s tree, free them from Satan’s tyranny that trust thy might power to save, and give them vict’ry o’er the grave. Rejoice! Rejoice! Emmanuel shall come to thee, O Israel!
11

Leader: Let us pray.

All: Almighty God, you brought forth a royal branch from the ancient stock of Jesse’s line: Grant that we who have been grafted into this heritage may bear fruit worthy of Jesus Christ; who with you and the Holy Spirit lives and reigns, one God, now and forever. Amen.

WAYS TO HELP Children at School:

  • If you have children who are eligible, get them vaccinated, and encourage others to do so as well.
  • Teach your child how to wear a mask safely and provide them with several clean ones each day when they attend school. Model mask-wearing yourself.
  • Pack small hand sanitizers in your child’s backpack for when hand washing with soap isn’t available.
    Keep your child home if they feel or seem sick.
  • Ahead of the sniffles, know where you and your child can get your child a PCR or diagnostic Covid test quickly. Check with your physician or pediatrician to see if they have them available.
  • Prayer in BCP for the care of children on page 829.

 

 

Please join us for a Thanksgiving Eve Service

with Special Music

Wednesday, Nov. 24 at 7:30 pm

St. Gabriel the Archangel Episcopal Church

17435 NW West Union Rd. Portland, Or 97229

The service with be both in-person and online live via Zoom.

To get the Zoom link, please call our office at 503-645-0744

Our music will feature vocalists
Jessica Israels, Cecily Kiester, Les Green, and Erik Hundtoft.
Margot Hanson on flute and David Saffert on piano.

image from http://images.unsplash.com; images below from Jessica Israels

We are continuing to observe Extended Advent at St. Gabriel’s, and today is the start of Extended Advent Week 3. Here is our Advent Family Activity Calendar, our prayers for families, and our traditional prayers for the third week of Extended Advent that begins Sunday, November 21, 2021.

Family Advent Activity Calendar for Nov. 21-27, 2021

Sun. Nov. 21st Today is the 3rd Sun. of Advent. Gather your family around the Advent wreath and light 3 purple candles and say the prayer for the 3rd week. Pray for peace in the world.
Mon. Nov. 22nd As days get colder, birds start having a harder time finding fresh water. Commit to putting a pie tin of fresh water out on a table on your patio or porch occasionally during the cold months where birds can find it. Be like St. Francis and care for the birds!
Tues. Nov. 23rd Before we lived in the Bethany area, there were indigenous people called the Chinook (among others) who lived here. Go to http://bitly.ws/geNC to find out more about how they lived and read their creation story.                                                                                                                                                            Wed. Nov. 24th Go out in your yard, public wetlands, or grocery store and see what you can use to make a centerpiece for your Thanksgiving table- branches with berries, cattails, grass stalks, dried or fresh flowers. Carve out a pumpkin, add water, and make a harvest arrangement.
Thu. Nov. 25th Either before or after you eat Thanksgiving dinner, go around the table and each person mention something they are thankful for this holiday. Sing the Doxology together!
Fri. Nov. 26th Some people use this day for shopping. Instead, think of some things you could make gifts from that would use things from nature or from recycled materials. Go to Pinterest for some great ideas and get busy!
Sat. Nov. 27th Have you set up your Nativity set yet? Take the Wise Ones and place them far from the manger. Move them a little closer every day. Hide baby Jesus until Dec. 24th.

Extended Advent Prayers for Families with Children

3rd Sunday of Advent– Ruler of Nations   11/21/21

(Light 3 purple candles)

We are in the time

when our nights are growing longer,

and our days are getting short.

Yes, it can seem cold and dark.

But–when we light the candles 

nestled in the green branches,

we see light shining through the darkness

and we remember what God promised us: 

Jesus is coming! 

God, we are all immigrants.  

We came to where we are now

and hoped we would be taken in.

We were.

Give us the grace to do the same for others. 

We are waiting. Amen. 

WAYS TO HELP Refugees: 

  • Go to Episcopalmigrationministries.org/afghan-allies, the settlement and migration ministry of The Episcopal Church to find out how to help including volunteering and donating money. 
  • Look for a group at St. Gabriel that is forming as of this writing to help Afghan refugee families settle in Portland and support them. 
  • Support DACA legislation.
  • Read out loud and discuss a Bible passage on accepting immigrants every day this week as a family:
    • 1 Chronicles 16:19-22; Deuteronomy 19:34 and 27:19; Psalm 146:9; Jeremiah 7:5-7; Romans 13:8; Colossians 3:11; Hebrews 13:1-3. 
  • Read books to your children about the immigrant experience like:
    • What Is a Refugee? by Elisa Gravel
    • Carmela Full of Wishes by Matt de la Peña
    • The Wall in the Middle of the Book by Jon Agee

Traditional Extended Advent Prayers

Prayers written by Carol A. Doran, DMA, Rev. Elise Feyerherm, PhD, and The Very Rev’d William H. Petersen, PhD, DD

3rd Sunday of Advent– Ruler of Nations   11/21/21

(Light 3 purple candles)

Leader: As our nights grow longer and our days grow short, we look on these earthly signs–light and green branches– and remember God’s promise to our world: Christ, our Light and our Hope, will come. Listen to these words from the Revelation to John:

 “And I saw what appeared to be a sea of glass mixed with fire, and those who had conquered the beast and its image and the number of its name, standing beside the sea of glass with harps of God in their hands.  And they sing the song of Moses, the servant of God, and the song of the Lamb: ‘Great and amazing are your deeds, Lord God the Almighty!  Just and true are your ways, King of the nations! Lord, who will not fear and glorify your name? For you alone are holy. All nations will come and worship before you, for your judgments have been revealed.’”       (Revelation 15:2-4)

Candle is lit while All sing:

O come, Desire of nations, bind in one the hearts of all mankind; bid thou our sad divisions cease, and be thyself our King of Peace. Rejoice!  Rejoice! Emmanuel shall come to thee, O Israel!

Leader: Let us pray.

All:  God of power and love, you raised Jesus from death to life, resplendent in glory to rule over all creation. Free the world to rejoice in his peace, to glory in his justice, and to live in his love. Unite all humankind in Jesus Christ your Son, Who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, One God, forever and ever. Amen.  

WAYS TO HELP Refugees: 

  • Go to episcopalmigrationministries.org/afghan-allies, the settlement and migration ministry of The Episcopal Church to find out how to help including volunteering and donating money. 
  • Look for a group at St. Gabriel that is forming as of this writing to help Afghan refugee families settle in Portland and support them. 
  • Support DACA legislation.
  • Read out loud and discuss a Bible passage on accepting immigrants every day this week as a family:

1 Chronicles 16:19-22; Deuteronomy 19:34 and 27:19; Psalm 146:9; Jeremiah 7:5-7; Romans 13:8; Colossians 3:11; Hebrews 13:1-3. 

  • Read books about the immigrant experience like:
    • Exit West by Mohsin Hamid
    • The Good Immigrant: 26 Writers Reflect on America edited by Nikesh Shukla and Chimene Suleyman
  • Read books to your children about the immigrant experience like:

What Is a Refugee? by Elisa Gravel

Carmela Full of Wishes by Matt de la Peña

The Wall in the Middle of the Book by Jon Agee

                     An Evensong Service of Lament:
Remembering the Victims of the Indian Boarding Schools

The people of St. Gabriel Episcopal Church invite you to join with us in an Evensong Service of Lament Remembering the Victims of the Indian Boarding Schools. Through words and music, sounds and silence, we will grieve the Native children, families, and communities who were victims of the boarding schools, acknowledge the ongoing intergenerational trauma and commit ourselves to the work of truth and reconciliation with the Indigenous communities in the church.

Sunday, November 21, 2021 5:00 pm

St. Gabriel the Archangel Episcopal Church
17435 N.W. West Union Road
Portland, Oregon

This service will be in-person as well as on YouTube live.
https://youtu.be/8fm3DWUzQIc

“We are grieved by recent discoveries of mass graves of Indigenous children on the grounds of former boarding schools, where Indigenous children experienced forced removal from their homes, assimilation and abuse. These acts of cultural genocide sought to erase these children’s identities as God’s beloved children.” 

-from the “Statement on Indigenous boarding schools by Presiding Bishop Michael Curry and President of the House of Deputies, Gay Clark Jennings, July 12, 2021

This evening donations will be accepted to support Indigi-Aid, a partnership between the Indigenous Ministries of the Episcopal Church and the Episcopal Diocese of Northern Michigan and scores of many Episcopal communities to raise money for food, basic need items, and medical supplies to aid our Indigenous communities across the Episcopal Church who have been ravaged by the Coronavirus inflicting severe health causalities.

Painting by Bobby Von Martin, Choctaw Nation

We are continuing to observe Extended Advent at St. Gabriel’s, and tomorrow is the start of Extended Advent Week 2. Here is our Advent Family Activity Calendar, our prayers for families, and our traditional prayers for the second week of Extended Advent that begins Sunday, November 14, 2021.

Family Advent Activity Calendar for Nov. 14-20, 2021

Sun. Nov. 14th Today is the 2nd Sun. of Advent. Gather the family around the Advent wreath, light 2 purple candles, and say the prayer for the second week. Give thanks to the Lord!
Mon. Nov. 15th Even though the flowers are dying, and the trees are getting bare, there is still lots of life going on. Go out in the yard and pick up some rocks and dead leaves. What do you see? Bugs? Slugs? Worms? Insect eggs? If you’re squeamish, use a stick!
Tues. Nov. 16th After dinner tonight play a spice guessing game. Have a grownup wrap paper around the outside of spice containers from the kitchen. Pass them around and try to guess what each one is. Smells like the holidays!
Wed. Nov. 17th Take those same spices like cinnamon sticks, whole cloves, and nutmegs and have a grownup put them in some apple cider or herbal tea and heat it slowly for about a half hour. Doesn’t it smell good? Serve some to everyone in a mug.
Thu. Nov. 18th There are lots of good apples this time of year. Have a grownup slice an apple horizontally midway between the top and bottom. What do you see at the core? What does it remind you of from the Christmas story?
Fri. Nov. 19th There is a full moon tonight called the Beaver Moon or Frosty Moon. If you set your alarm for 1:04 am tonight you will see a near total eclipse! Then you could go back to bed.
Sat. Nov. 20th There are 100 plants in the Bible. Look these up- which ones would you eat? Ezekiel 4:9; John 12:13, 24; Proverbs 31:16; Matthew 23:23; Matthew 13:31, Genesis 43:11; Isaiah 5:4.

Extended Advent Prayers for Families with Children

2nd Sunday of Extended Advent – The Lord 11/14/21
(Light the 1st and 2nd purple candles)

We are in the time
when our nights are growing longer,
and our days are getting short.
Yes, it can seem cold and dark.
But–when we light the candles
nestled in the green branches,
we see light shining through the darkness
and we remember what God promised us:
Jesus is coming!

Lord, show me how to love everyone.
Help me not to judge
the color of a brother’s skin,
what religion a sister practices,
what country a sibling came from,
or anything else that would separate us.
Keep us together, loving and helping each other.
We are waiting. Amen

WAYS TO HELP Foster Racial Justice:
Read out loud and discuss a Bible passage about racial justice every day this week as a family:
1 John 2:11; 1 Samuel 16:7; Acts 17:26; Exodus 22:21; Galatians 3:28; John 7:24; Leviticus 19:33-34.
Prayers for social and racial justice in BCP on pages 823, 840.
Educate your children about racial justice with books like these:
Let’s Talk About Race by Newberry Honor Book author Julius Lester
We March by Shane W. Evans
Separate Is Never Equal by Duncan Tonatiuh
I Am Whole: A Multi-Racial Children’s Book Celebrating Diversity, Language, Race and Culture by Shola Oz

Traditional Extended Advent Prayers

Prayers written by Carol A. Doran, DMA, Rev. Elise Feyerherm, PhD, and The Very Rev’d William H. Petersen, PhD, DD

2nd Sunday of Extended Advent–
The Lord 11/14/21

(2 purple candles)
Leader: As our nights grow longer and our days grow short, we look on these earthly signs–light and green branches– and remember God’s promise to our world: Christ, our Light and our Hope, will come. Listen to the words of Ezekiel the prophet:
“A new heart I will give you, and a new spirit I will put within you; and I will remove from your body the heart of stone and give you a heart of flesh. I will put my spirit within you, and make you follow my statutes and be careful to observe my ordinances. Then you shall live in the land that I gave to your ancestors; and you shall be my people, and I will be your God.” (Ezekiel 36:26-28)
Candle is lit while All sing: O come, o come thou Lord of might, who to thy tribes on Sinai’s height In ancient times didst give the law, in cloud, and majesty, and awe. Rejoice! Rejoice! Emmanuel shall come to thee, O Israel!
Leader: Let us pray.
All: O Lord our God, you gave your law that righteousness might abound: Put it into our hearts to love justice for others as much as we desire it for ourselves, that, as we know you to be our judge, so we may welcome your reign as it is manifested through Jesus Christ our savior; to whom, with you and the Holy Spirit, be dominion and praise for and we remember what God promised us:
Jesus is coming!
7

WAYS TO HELP Foster Racial Justice:

Either read and pray over or read out loud and discuss a Bible passage about racial justice every day this week as a family:
John 2:11; 1 Samuel 16:7; Acts 17:26; Exodus 22:21; Galatians 3:28; John 7:24; Leviticus 19:33-34.
Prayers for social and racial justice in BCP on pages 823, 840.
Educate yourself about racial justice with books like these:
How to Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi
The Color of Compromise: The Truth about the American Church’s Complicity in Racism by Jemar Tisby
Be the Bridge: Pursuing God’s Heart for Racial Reconciliation by LaTasha Morrison
Educate your children about racial justice with books like these:
Let’s Talk About Race by Newberry Honor Book author Julius Lester
We March by Shane W. Evans
Separate Is Never Equal by Duncan Tonatiuh
I Am Whole: A Multi-Racial Children’s Book Celebrating Diversity, Language, Race and Culture by Shola Oz

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One of St. Gabriel’s most unique observances is Extended Advent, which we celebrate for seven weeks instead of four. In its origin, the Season of Advent was nearly seven weeks long (paralleling Lent) until it was shortened to just four weeks in the 11th century by Pope Gregory VI. By expanding Advent season as originally intended we have found that this quiet time of prayer and reflection becomes more meaningful as we wait for what God promised us- a surprising Savior born as a tiny baby in a manger. For children, an earlier Advent allows time to take a pause, anticipate, and observe the quiet ritual around our sacred and ancient story before Santa and secular Christmas completely take over. St. Gabriel’s was inspired to celebrate extended Advent through “The Advent Project” created by The Very Rev’d William H. Petersen, PhD, DD, who is Emeritus Dean & Professor of Bexley Hall Seminary, an Episcopal priest, and occasional visitor to St. Gabriel’s. Rev. Petersen wrote a book What Are We Waiting For?:  Re-imagining Advent for Time to Come in which St. Gabriel is featured as one of the churches observing extended Advent. Our Extended Advent booklets for the entire 2021 season are available here.

See below for our Advent Family Activity Calendar, our prayers for families, and our traditional prayers for the first week of Extended Advent that begins Sunday, November 7, 2021. 

Family Advent Activity Calendar for Nov. 7- 13, 2021

Sun. Nov. 7th Today is the 1st Sun. of Advent. Gather the family around the Advent wreath after dinner or before bed. Light 1 purple candle in your Advent wreath and say the prayers from your Advent booklet. The waiting has begun!
Mon. Nov. 8th John the Baptist said, “Get ready for the coming of the Lord! How could you do that?
Tues. Nov. 9th What could you do to help prepare your house or apartment for Advent? Dusting and washing windows can be fun. Make your house sparkle in anticipation!
Wed. Nov. 10th Take some coins from your savings or ask to earn some. Each day of Advent put a coin in your popcorn box you decorated for church school. At the end of Advent, bring it to church and donate it.
Thu. Nov. 11th Today is Veterans Day, when we remember the soldiers trying to keep peace in the world and keep us safe. Say a prayer for their safety and give thanks for their work for us.
Fri. Nov. 12th To help spread peace in the world, draw a dove on white paper and cut it out. Write “peace” on it. Use clear tape to put it up on your front door or window to remind everyone what you stand for.
Sat. Nov. 13th It is still harvest time and so a great time for soup. Which one is your favorite? Ask a grownup to help you gather ingredients and make some soup for dinner. Find a simple bread recipe to go with it.

Extended Advent Prayers for Families with Children

1st Sunday of Extended Advent– Wisdom 11/7/21
(Light 1 purple candle)

We are in the time
when our nights are growing longer,
and our days are getting short.
Yes, it can seem cold and dark.
But–when we light the candles
nestled in the green branches,
we see light shining through the darkness
and we remember what God promised us:
Jesus is coming!

God, please give us the wisdom
to do what is necessary to defeat this virus.
Help people show love
by making good decisions
that help their brothers, sisters, and siblings
to stay healthy.
Give health caregivers strength
to do their difficult jobs.
We are waiting. Amen

WAYS TO HELP The sick and the healers:

  • Continue handwashing with soap and water- it’s still an important way to stay healthy.
  • Get vaccinated for Covid-19 and the flu and encourage others to be vaccinated. Have children under 12 vaccinated as soon as it is recommended.
  • Wear a mask when in public, following guidelines.
  • Donate blood if you are over 17.
  • If you know a healthcare worker, ask if your family can help them with childcare, errands, meals, or housework.
  • Pray for the sick from the Book of Common Prayer pages 453-461.
  • For now try to avoid any risky activities that could injure you while hospitals are so full such as climbing high ladders, working on your roof, using chainsaws, and so on.

Traditional Extended Advent Prayers 

Prayers written by Carol A. Doran, DMA, Rev. Elise Feyerherm, PhD, and The Very Rev’d William H. Petersen, PhD, DD

1st Sunday of Extended Advent–
Wisdom 11/7/21

(Light 1 purple candle)
Leader: As our nights grow longer and our days grow short, we look on these earthly signs–light and green branches– and remember God’s promise to our world: Christ, our Light and our Hope, will come. Listen to the words of Solomon:
“O God of my ancestors and Lord of mercy, who have made all things by your word, and by your wisdom have formed humankind to have dominion over the creatures you have made, and rule the world in holiness and righteousness, and pronounce judgment in uprightness of soul, give me the wisdom that sits by your throne, and do not reject me from among your servants….With you is wisdom, she who knows your works and was present when you made the world; she understands what is pleasing in your sight and what is right according to your commandments. Send her forth from the holy heavens, and from the throne of your glory send her, that she may labor at my side, and that I may learn what is pleasing to you.” (Wisdom of Solomon 9:1-4, 9-10)
People: God is the source of our life in Christ Jesus, who became for us wisdom from God, and righteousness and sanctification and redemption. (1 Corinthians 1:30)
Candle is lit while All sing: O come, thou Wisdom from on high, who ord’rest all things mightily; to us the path of knowledge show, and
5
to whom with you and the Holy Spirit be praise and dominion for ever and ever. Amen.

WAYS TO HELP The Homeless and the Hungry:

  • Support needy families in the Beaverton School District through The Gabriel Center by donating clothing anytime; and instant food, laundry detergent pods, school supplies, or whatever is requested each month.
  • Drop off non-perishable food to an Oregon Food Bank partner Rock Creek Church by Westview High School at 4470 NW 185TH Ave. Portland, OR 97229 in their drop-off box.
  • Keep supplies like clean socks, water bottles, non-perishable snacks, and warm gloves in your car to give to people on highway ramps and in parking lot entries.re
  • Support eviction moratoriums during the pandemic.
  • Prayer in BCP for the Poor and Neglected on page 826.

image from i.pinimg.com

St. Gabriel’s joyfully returned amidst laughter and tears for hybrid in-person/Zoom worship on All Saints Sunday October 31. We figured it all out, from operating new cameras, to passing the peace in a safe manner, to having our first fellowship event in almost two years with our “Soup for Saints” Ingathering event for the culmination of our Stewardship campaign. Blessings and thanksgivings to the many hands who made it all happen.

Dear St Gabriel’s friends and family,
I am excited to announce that on Sunday, October 31st we will return to in-person worship at our 8:00 and 10:00 am services. The Wednesday 9:30 am Healing service will start in person on November 3rd. Church school and youth group activities are still in the planning stage. The Zoom option for worship will remain as part of our way to continue to connect with each other near and far.

Sunday, October 31st will be a day of great joy and celebration when we are together again. We will celebrate All Saints Day, and following the 10:00 am service SOUP FOR THE SAINTS will be served for all who want to participate. We will have chili, a chicken, and a vegetarian soup option available, along with bread and brownies. You are welcome to share the meal at the church or take it “to go”.

We will culminate our Stewardship Campaign on this day as we present and bless the pledge cards offered by the members of the congregation. If you have not returned your pledge card, we ask that you do so or be sure to bring it on October 31st. It is important to remember that as the congregation is in a time of transition, your financial support is essential. Expenses for the calling of a new Rector will increase the fiscal need in the new year. Please prayerfully discern your monetary gift to St Gabriel the Archangel parish.

I look forward to seeing you in person (and perhaps on Zoom) on October 31st.

The Covid protocols remain in effect with the expectation that attendees will be vaccinated. Please adhere to the following guidelines presented by Bishop Akiyama’s Pastoral Guidance For Safer Worship:
+Masks are required for indoor gatherings, and beginning August 27, masks are required for outdoor gatherings where distance cannot be kept between households.
+Continue to provide masks to visitors and members who arrive without one.
+Wash your hands thoroughly and often. Continue to provide hand sanitizer to visitors and staff throughout your building.
+Reduce the number of individuals gathering for in-person worship or consider online services.
+Clergy should wear a mask while preaching and celebrating the Eucharist. Lectors, cantors, and all participants in liturgy should be masked.
+Congregational singing is not advised. However, if your congregation does choose to sing, all should remain masked. Cantors, soloists, and choirs should be masked and maintain distance from each other and the congregation.
+Communion should be received in one kind only. Clergy should remind congregations that receiving Communion in one kind constitutes full Communion. (we will continue to use our wine/wafer combination until the supply is gone and then offer consecrated bread only)
+Exchanging The Peace should be done from a distance rather than in the form of a hug or handshake.

~Canon Linda

“For surely, I know the plans I have for you, says the Lord, plans for your welfare and not for harm, to give you a future with hope” Jeremiah 29:11

image from clipground.com/images/free-christian-clip-art

The gardens around St. Gabriel are beautiful throughout the year, but—oh—-autumn! We are grateful for the many hands that tend our grounds and Community Garden so we can bask in God’s glory surrounding our church.

Welcome to our Community Garden

Wood pile in fallen leaeves

Crabapple branch with fruit and berries

The last intact glorious sunflower head

 

Autumn blooms in the circle garden

There are still tomatoes left to ripen

St. Gabriel loves St. Francis and this year on Sunday October 3rd we have family and pet-friendly worship services wrapped around the love and care of animals and all creation. At 8:00 and 10:00 am we are offering online Zoom animal blessings, a video featuring the pets of St. Gabriel presented by Gabriel’s Friends, our animal ministry, young readers using a child-friendly version of the lectionary, and an unforgettable sermon with a costumed drama based on the miracle of St. Francis and the wolf.

Make sure you have your children join the service with you- in their treasure bags there is a St. Francis activity sheet with stickers they can work on as they watch and listen. If your family misses the live service, remember our services are available by the Monday after here on our website and our YouTube channel.

We will also offer an in-person pet blessing after the 10:00 am service from 11:15 am-12:00 pm. Load your darling animals into the car and drive up through the church’s upper circle parking lot. We will bless your pets while you stay masked and in the car. You don’t have to mask your pets! 😉 We hope to see you there!

image from i.pinimg.com

With the Covid-19 crisis resulting in church going exclusively online we have seen our reliance on electronic communication grow, particularly concerning our e-blasts, meeting on Zoom, our church website, and our weekly newsletter The Messenger. Now that some members have discovered the convenience and belonging that being online can bring, we realize that our online presence will be an ongoing part of St. Gabriel, even after we resume being able to meet and worship in person. Hence, the renewed importance of a renewed Communications Ministry.

The ministry will be concerned with anything that “communicates” including:

  • How to create a strong, inclusive hybrid between online and in-person worship;
  • Creating an editorial policy for The Messenger and website guest blogs;
  • Standardizing our church “advertising” language including in The Messenger, on our Facebook and Instagram social media accounts and our website, and our church signage inside and outside;
  • The most effective ways to communicate between church leadership and the congregation;
  • Updating photo permissions from church members;
  • Communicating St. Gabriel events and news with the Diocese of Oregon.

Would you like to join this ministry? Please contact Page Clothier at page@stgabrielpdx.org.

image from www.gettingsmart.com

YES- we know we all miss seeing each other in person, but to protect those we love we are resuming church school online over Zoom for now. We will continue to monitor the situation and meet in person finally when it feels like the safe thing to do to keep everyone healthy. We will continually assess the situation, specifically on October 31st.

St. Gabriel church school is for kids preschool up, depending on our students’ interest. Our younger students will need some support from grownups, and the older students can serve as mentors to the younger ones. Our lessons are created by teachers and based on the lectionary readings for the day, usually the Gospel. We play a fun online game or have a participatory art activity based on what we have learned. There are always two SAFE church trained teachers online with students and grownups are welcome too. Note that we have a fresh new Zoom link to join in. Get it in the password protected area at the bottom of this page, in The Messenger emailed newsletter, in our weekly e-blast, or by calling our office at 503-645-0744 during office hours.

Participating students should have had a “treasure bag,” delivered to their front porch this week full of church school supplies, Extended Advent materials, and some fun extras. Each student should have their own bag, along with one Advent bag per family. If you would like your child to receive a bag and try out online church school, let us know here.

This school year we will be providing additional support for preschool-age children who have a hard time using Zoom, and will have weekly suggestions for ways for parents to prepare them ahead of time to play the games and participate. Families will have access to the written lesson here so you can prepare younger students or present it to your child yourself if you’d prefer.

We hope to see you online- we will reassess the online vs. in-person situation constantly, specifically on October 31st but maybe earlier. See you online!

Our Church Building Must Close Again, But St. Gabriel Is Still Open

Wednesday, August 18, 2021

Greetings friends of St. Gabriel Church,

As of Thursday, August 19, all worship services at St. Gabriel will return to Zoom only. Until that time, we will not have in-sanctuary worship. We will reassess this decision on October 31.

The current reality is that the Delta variant presents a growing danger to our community and that anyone who becomes seriously ill may face a health system that is unable to care for them. From the beginning of this pandemic, St. Gabriel has placed safety first.

Since March of last year, our spiritual community has weathered this storm with determination, love and the grace of the Holy Spirit. Let us continue to do so, by caring for each other and worshiping safely until this COVID wave is behind us. Then we can all celebrate together in-person once again.

If you need a Zoom link to attend one of our worship services, go to the password-protected link at the bottom right and enter the password, or if you don’t know the password, please contact our church office during office hours at 503-645-0744 or stgabe@stgabrielonline.org, or you can try messenger@stgabrielonline.org.

~Canon Linda Potter, Interim Rector     ~Rod MacDow, Sr. Warden

Be with us, Holy Spirit;
nothing can separate us from your love.
Be with us as of old,
fill us with your power,
direct all our thoughts to your goodness.
Be present, Holy Spirit;
bring faith and healing and peace.

~New Zealand Prayer Book

We are happy to invite the people of our beloved St. Gabriel Episcopal Church community and prospective rectors to finally be able to pore over this beautiful booklet, our Church Profile.

This will be one of our greatest tools to attract a new rector and assist our Search Committee in their important work. This online document also serves to show us who we are, what we value, and what our future could be. You may be surprised with the questionnaire results- the Profile Committee was! Know that we had very high participation in the questionnaire- way above average for other churches’ profiles. Everything you see represented in our Profile Booklet was based on the results of the questionnaire, with traditions and historical info researched from church records, interviews with former and current St. Gabriel clergy and long-time members, and information gathered from St. Gabriel’s current Ministry Heads. It’s fascinating and a wonderful portrait and record of us!

Church members please check your email for the special edition of The Messenger containing information about the presentations of the Profile to the congregation on Sunday, August 22nd after both services. If you are a member of the public and would like more information, please contact our church office at 503-645-0744 or  by email.


The Profile Booklet is available to view in a PDF document by clicking here:
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1bbMaHlC3MPFroFOgoSFNaPVHULrFgTXU?usp=sharing


“…acting out of an abundance of caution for everyone is the most loving thing we can do.”

As you’ve no doubt heard, the Delta variant of the Corona virus is spreading through Oregon. Governor Brown has put a statewide mask mandate back in place for indoor spaces. In response, St. Gabriel has made the difficult decision to cancel or postpone all in-person indoor meetings and gatherings except for sanctuary worship, until the current wave of cases is behind us, effective immediately Friday, August 13, 2021.

This is painful – we’ve only just begun to hold events at the church – but from the very first day of this pandemic, we’ve adhered to the primary goal of safety first for all who come here. On October 1, 2021 we will reassess this policy – we all want to reopen again as soon as it is safe.

Our Sunday and Wednesday worship services will continue both in the sanctuary and on Zoom. Everyone will be masked and social distancing will be strongly encouraged. Besides worship, all indoor planned activities at the church will be cancelled or held on Zoom.  Postponed are the return to in-person church school, youth group, and a staffed nursery until further notice, although we will offer online church school again starting on Sunday, September 12th at 9:30 am until further notice.

For all of us, these setbacks are disappointing and acting out of an abundance of caution for everyone is the most loving thing we can do. With God’s help and love to sustain us and the community’s support for one another, we will make it through.



For information about getting vaccinated including where to get one in Oregon, please go to https://govstatus.egov.com/find-covid-19-vaccine .
virus image from firstpost.com

The St. Gabriel community celebrated Independence Day and the glory of God by having an outdoor and online Eucharist followed by a picnic on Sunday, July 4th. What a wonderful way to celebrate together in every sense of the word!

We held our first in-person service in over a year, and on Pentecost, no less!

The 10am service was a hybrid of in-person and Zoom, with a screen set up so that folks in the church could see the folks online, and extra cameras so that the folks on Zoom could see everything going on in the sanctuary. It was an absolutely glorious combination of the new and the old. Drive-up Eucharist was also offered so that everyone could come to the Lord’s table, whether they had experienced the service online or in person. Thank you to everyone who helped make our first hybrid service a success!

Our Profile Booklet is Nearly Finished

Although it’s been a little quiet, not to worry! St. Gabriel’s Profile Committee has still been hard at work wrapping up the Profile Booklet to use in our rector search. In this digital age, our “booklet” is actually an online document rather than a printed one. The finished version will be ready to present to the vestry and clergy the first week of June, and then it will go to the diocese and the bishop for approval. After that it will be presented to the congregation and released for consideration to new rector candidates. The Search Committee that actually looks for and considers candidates is formed and ready to start meeting to continue the next step towards finding our new rector.

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Our New Church Website Design is Nearly Finished Too!

Our website is being simultaneously redesigned at the same time our Profile Booklet is being created. Our goal is to have it ready by the end of May so that when our rector candidates look at our website, it looks fresh and current and is easy to navigate. When it is live, we will let you know in The Messenger so you can take a look. Going forward we hope you will visit often for current events, news, and contact information.

© 2021 St Gabriel Episcopal Church

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